SINGAPORE POLICE FORCE TRAINING

The Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police (GCSPF) is a line department of the Singapore police force. Member of GC are trained to be highly-skilled and are selected for their display of strong discipline in their task. The principle rate of the contingent is to be a special guard force and it is currently used as a counter-terrorist force. So to full fill the demand of the selection of BGN Salute Gorkha is providing Pre-Singapore Police Recruiting Preparations Trainings.

Brief History of Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police

The GC was formed on 9 April 1949 in the wake of Indian independence from the British Empire, when Gurkhas of Nepal battalions from the Indian Army were divided between the Indian Army and the British Army. Those transferred to the British Army were posted to other remaining British Colonies. In Malaya and Singapore, their presence was required in the Malayan Emergency, and their roles were to replace the Sikh unit in Singapore which reverted to the Indian Army on Indian independence.

Just a year after their formation, their presence became an asset when racial riots between the Malay and European communities broke out over the disputed custody of Maria Hertogh. The GC troopers were again activated when major rioting erupted all over the country between the ethnic Malays and Chinese on Prophet Mohammed’s birthday from 21 July 1964 till September that same year.

Their presence as a neutral force was important because local police officers were often perceived to be (or were even expected to be) biased towards their own ethnic groups when handling racial disturbances, further fuelling discontent and violence. Officers who attempt to carry out their duties impartially and in full accordance with the law also face social backlash from their own ethnic communities, a difficult situation which can even lead to physical harm to individual officers.

In his autobiography, former Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew recounted the use of the Gurkha Contingent as an impartial force at the time when Singapore had just gained independence. He wrote:

“When I returned to Oxley Road [Lee’s residence], Gurkha policemen (recruited by the British from Nepal) were posted as sentries. To have either Chinese policemen shooting Malays or Malay policemen shooting Chinese would have caused widespread repercussions. The Gurkhas, on the other hand, were neutral, besides having a reputation for total discipline and loyalty.”

he Gurkha Contingent as an impartial force at the time when Singapore had just gained independence. He wrote:

“When I returned to Oxley Road [Lee’s residence], Gurkha policemen (recruited by the British from Nepal) were posted as sentries. To have either Chinese policemen shooting Malays or Malay policemen shooting Chinese would have caused widespread repercussions. The Gurkhas, on the other hand, were neutral, besides having a reputation for total discipline and loyalty.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *